Friday Update! 4.14.17

    • Cover artwork for a band had better have the bands name on it, so you know what band you are looking at in the store. I have seen alot of artwork inside the cd/whatever that does not have the bands name on it (those days are pretty much gone).

      A better analogy is if a album had a statement before every song saying you are listening to the beatles or whatever.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Pandaemonium ().

    • Transience wrote:

      Ossuary wrote:

      Let's not start throwing the "N" word around there. This isn't one of THOSE forums. :P

      It's got nothing to do with ideas of normal. The art looks nice. Many of us (probably most) would like to see the art. It's painstakingly obvious that the logo is actually on the sleeves so that screenshots / videos of the gameplay will always include the game logo, but it's just a very inelegant solution. Why cover up really nice looking art with a big clunky logo? Stick it in the bottom corner of the gameboard or something if you absolutely have to have it on screen - or, you know, let your game stand on its own without feeling the need to plaster your name all over it at every moment. What are we, TRUMP? ;)
      Just take a look at album artwork for about every single rock and metal act in the entire world. Everyone has their logo in big bold lines over the artwork. Exceptions are certainly oddities. I have over a thousand of these records in my collection and probably less than 10 that do not have a logo over the artwork.
      It really isn't that strange.

      And honestly I think artwork can become better with a logo over it. It adds a certain consistency which I find attractive.

      I mean I'm fine if HEX starts to offer removal for a price. But the tendency of this thread and others about the same subject is that somehow the poor artwork is sacrificed in favor of the despicable advertising and I just don't agree with that sentiment.
      That's a deeply flawed analogy. Album art is akin to the video game box having the company logo or name of the game on it - of course it goes there, it's the front cover, and what you see in the store. Having the logo on the sleeves is more like once you get the game home and start playing it, it continues to list the game name on the back of your COD character while he runs around shooting people, or Ken from Street Fighter having his face replaced by the words "STREET FIGHTER" at all times. :P

      I'm pretty sure even the most conceited music artists don't say "Yo my name is Lil' Rappa!" at the beginning of every single verse of every single song just to make sure you haven't forgotten who you were listening to. Well... maybe Kanye. ;)
      --ossuary

      "Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none."
      - Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well
    • Ossuary wrote:

      Transience wrote:

      Ossuary wrote:

      Let's not start throwing the "N" word around there. This isn't one of THOSE forums. :P

      It's got nothing to do with ideas of normal. The art looks nice. Many of us (probably most) would like to see the art. It's painstakingly obvious that the logo is actually on the sleeves so that screenshots / videos of the gameplay will always include the game logo, but it's just a very inelegant solution. Why cover up really nice looking art with a big clunky logo? Stick it in the bottom corner of the gameboard or something if you absolutely have to have it on screen - or, you know, let your game stand on its own without feeling the need to plaster your name all over it at every moment. What are we, TRUMP? ;)
      Just take a look at album artwork for about every single rock and metal act in the entire world. Everyone has their logo in big bold lines over the artwork. Exceptions are certainly oddities. I have over a thousand of these records in my collection and probably less than 10 that do not have a logo over the artwork.It really isn't that strange.

      And honestly I think artwork can become better with a logo over it. It adds a certain consistency which I find attractive.

      I mean I'm fine if HEX starts to offer removal for a price. But the tendency of this thread and others about the same subject is that somehow the poor artwork is sacrificed in favor of the despicable advertising and I just don't agree with that sentiment.
      That's a deeply flawed analogy. Album art is akin to the video game box having the company logo or name of the game on it - of course it goes there, it's the front cover, and what you see in the store. Having the logo on the sleeves is more like once you get the game home and start playing it, it continues to list the game name on the back of your COD character while he runs around shooting people, or Ken from Street Fighter having his face replaced by the words "STREET FIGHTER" at all times. :P
      I'm pretty sure even the most conceited music artists don't say "Yo my name is Lil' Rappa!" at the beginning of every single verse of every single song just to make sure you haven't forgotten who you were listening to. Well... maybe Kanye. ;)
      We are apparently of differing opinions concerning what is important. I would compare music to actual gameplay and album art to art in games. Using your analogy of having artists say their name at the start of a track would be akin to the HEX logo popping up or visualizing everytime you take an in-game action. At least that's how i see it. When I listen to music while looking at my CD and seeing the band's logo it feels the same as playing HEX while looking at my sleeves and seeing the logo.

      See, this is all very subjective.
      "Ignorant beliefs are stains upon the mind."
    • Transience wrote:


      We are apparently of differing opinions concerning what is important. I would compare music to actual gameplay and album art to art in games. Using your analogy of having artists say their name at the start of a track would be akin to the HEX logo popping up or visualizing everytime you take an in-game action. At least that's how i see it. When I listen to music while looking at my CD and seeing the band's logo it feels the same as playing HEX while looking at my sleeves and seeing the logo.
      See, this is all very subjective.

      The difference being, if you weirdly want to sit and look at the cover of your album while you listen to your music, that's your own weird choice that you're free to indulge in, whereas I have no goddamn choice but to constantly have that idiotic large logo plastered on my Hex screen, covering up a nice piece of art that I might like to see otherwise if it weren't covered over with no recourse. ;)
      --ossuary

      "Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none."
      - Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well
    • Im fairly sure the logo is there as advertising for the game so if someone sees it they know what the game is. There is little reason for people playing Hex to be reminded by their sleeves they are playing Hex.

      A different way to look at it though is that maybe if the logo wasn't there, someone would see a screenshot and think "damn that's some cool art" and then find out what the game is. I cant think of many times there would be an image of a Hex game and no way for someone to find out what the game is if they wanted to, so the logo seems pretty pointless.


      Im pretty sure the logo has been brought up many times before though so either they have some measurement that shows we are wrong and the logo is actually useful or they just don't listen and think they know best despite players telling them otherwise.
    • Ossuary wrote:

      Transience wrote:

      We are apparently of differing opinions concerning what is important. I would compare music to actual gameplay and album art to art in games. Using your analogy of having artists say their name at the start of a track would be akin to the HEX logo popping up or visualizing everytime you take an in-game action. At least that's how i see it. When I listen to music while looking at my CD and seeing the band's logo it feels the same as playing HEX while looking at my sleeves and seeing the logo.
      See, this is all very subjective.
      The difference being, if you weirdly want to sit and look at the cover of your album while you listen to your music, that's your own weird choice that you're free to indulge in, whereas I have no goddamn choice but to constantly have that idiotic large logo plastered on my Hex screen, covering up a nice piece of art that I might like to see otherwise if it weren't covered over with no recourse. ;)
      That's weird?

      I know a lot of people who do just that. I do it every Sunday where I take one record and play it while looking at the CD, reading the lyrics and generally focusing all attention on the music and it's package.

      Anyway; that's why i said; i'm fine with a removal. Just thought the sentiment that obviously everybody wanted that needed some dispelling. ;)
      "Ignorant beliefs are stains upon the mind."
    • Transience wrote:

      It's not a cover up, it's just a logo over the artwork and I think that the logo enhances the artwork.

      You're taking your subjective ideas about how something must look and are trying to force it as normative.
      I wasn't trying to say they were ACTUALLY covering it up, but that's the perspective it gives.

      The only places you see giant logos over artwork in practice are on advertisements/promotional artwork(such as cd covers, as you mentioned) which, in my eyes, the sleeves are not.

      If you cover up a giant part of a piece of art in almost any other situation, the message it sends to most onlookers is that you have something to hide. There's some part of the art you don't want people seeing.

      Obviously, in this case, that's not what they're doing. The art is fantastic, but if you show these sleeves to someone who hasn't seen the parent artwork, their first reaction is likely going to be 'what are they trying to hide?'. I know this, because I did exactly that to a few people. I showed images of a few of my favourite sleeves to several people who didn't play Hex and asked them 'what do you think of these digital deck-sleeves?' and their responses were all something to the effect of 'what are they trying to hide with that giant logo?' or 'why would anyone use that, it's mostly just the game's logo on a sleeve? Is the art that bad?'

      Then I showed them the actual art and they were all flabbergasted that Hex was covering it up.

      It is obviously subjective, and thus there will be differing opinions so nobody's wrong here, but I think you're the first person who doesn't work for Hex I've ever seen say the logo enhances the artwork. To me, it just seems so silly to cover up artwork like that.

      If I have amazing art in a game, I want players to show it off at every turn. I want players to be seeing the art as much as they can, and I want anyone who looks at screenshots of the game or watches a stream to just be amazed by the artwork wherever they look. I don't want them having to wonder why I put the logo on every sleeve as if I had something to hide.
      Gamer. Streamer. Photographer. Writer. Anime Lover. Possessor of Stuffed Animals.

      Also... I'm terrible at this game.
    • Yggdrasill wrote:

      Im fairly sure the logo is there as advertising for the game so if someone sees it they know what the game is. There is little reason for people playing Hex to be reminded by their sleeves they are playing Hex.

      A different way to look at it though is that maybe if the logo wasn't there, someone would see a screenshot and think "damn that's some cool art" and then find out what the game is. I cant think of many times there would be an image of a Hex game and no way for someone to find out what the game is if they wanted to, so the logo seems pretty pointless.


      Im pretty sure the logo has been brought up many times before though so either they have some measurement that shows we are wrong and the logo is actually useful or they just don't listen and think they know best despite players telling them otherwise.
      They can just put the logo on the battleboard* if that's the case, instead of blocking the art on the sleeves.

      *Of course, then we'll want to pay-to-delogo our battleboards since those are a thing now, which I guess puts us right back where we started.