Set 10

    • It's a shame. I loved Hex. As a game it was great, truly.

      I've gone on to play Arena, never thought I would enjoy that but it's ridiculous how good it is. That could have been HEX. They had a top client and a well designed game (minus the obnoxious RNG mechanics), they just had to make the economy different than it is so it was cheaper to play.

      This game could have survived long term, I'm sure of it.
      "Ignorant beliefs are stains upon the mind."
    • Transience wrote:

      It's a shame. I loved Hex. As a game it was great, truly.

      I've gone on to play Arena, never thought I would enjoy that but it's ridiculous how good it is. That could have been HEX. They had a top client and a well designed game (minus the obnoxious RNG mechanics), they just had to make the economy different than it is so it was cheaper to play.

      This game could have survived long term, I'm sure of it.
      Hex's PvE aspects, story and art combined with the client and smooth gameplay of Arena honestly makes me hard as a rock. My soul weeps that this will never be realised.
    • AnomalyCobra wrote:

      i dunno if 20 active forum users would warrant more than a survive agenda.
      But that's 20 active forum users who've stuck it out for, what, 7 months now? Loads of former HEX players still -want- this game to be good, and I bet we're all secretly hoping for some announcement that the IP and game were sold to a different company.

      I wouldn't even mind losing my entire account if that happened. I've spent over 500 euros on this and I wouldn't mind if my account was lost in the rebuilding of HEX in the hands of a company that knows what to do and engages its community.

      This game was phenomenal in its concept and parts of its execution. Its card mechanisms were so unbelievably fun and outlandish and creative… The world so vibrant and energetic!

      It's just that PvE got no more development, Siege's design was awful even on paper, never mind the execution, and PvP went stale.

      And yet, despite how agonising this death is, we've still got people hanging around, begging for a little glimmer of hope that this thing turns around.

      I honestly believe this game can succeed if done right.
    • New

      Firellius wrote:

      Loads of former HEX players still -want- this game to be good
      Us former Hex players may no longer have even a last desperate sliver of confidence or respect for the developer, and haven't opened up the client in ages..
      ..but despite that, yes, we're still keeping a special place in our hearts for Hex, we check in for updates every so often, and we would definitely pick the game up again under the right circumstances.

      As is regularly noted, Hex does benefit from having a dedicated and passionate userbase. Which only makes the way HexEnt handled things that much more frustrating.

      Repeatedly, the impression was given that many employees in HexEnt were willing to give a performance more in line with our expectations, but that they were hindered by Cory's almost megalomaniacal control over the direction of the company, with him heavily resisting input from any outside sources and being unwilling to properly delegate tasks. Add in the Molyneux-level promise breaking, and Cory's passion for his work was all too readily overshadowed by his limitations and misconducts (or at least, by the circumstances which led to our having perceptions of such aspects).
      Whether that impression of Cory is justified or an unfortunate outcome of the company's inexperience and poor communication skills isn't meaningful. What matters is that there's just no trust whatsoever for the leadership of the company, anymore. The best way to reinstill confidence in the userbase would be to put someone entirely new at the top of HexEnt (and, of course, it isn't as if Cory can't still arrange to have final say over creative elements in such a circumstance, so long as he's able to resist taking control over management direction).
      The firmest and perhaps easiest way to swap out leadership would be to pass off control of the IP to another developer (though as dead and poor in reputation as Hex is, it's unclear if anyone'd be willing to pick it up now). Unfortunately, Cory has made it emphatically clear that Hex is his pet project, and he'd rather the ship go down with him than it be given to a better captain. Rather, the time for passing the game off was years ago. Now.. well, we are where we are.

      While many of us would likely come back even under less encouraging circumstances, with even a sliver of new content available, we wouldn't feel confident spending money or encouraging new players to join [of course, all our efforts in that regard over the years always ended poorly anyway, thanks to HexEnt refusing to listen to us on even the most basic things, so I think most of us gave up on invites long ago anyway]. Short of Cory paying for future updates out-of-pocket, there's simply no way for HexEnt to justify supporting the game any longer, now that they've let it get to the point it's at.

      Near as I can tell, Cryptozoic had surprising success with their initial WoW trading card expansions, and then had only dipped a bit further into simple trading card releases and their expansions over the next 2 years until Hex began development. They had limited experience with game design, no experience at all with user-responsive content, and no experience at all with digital content. A capable team would have been adaptable and responsive to its users despite their inexperience, but unfortunately, the management didn't manage to rise up to the challenge. If Cryptozoic wants to move forward as a succesful company, then its management needs to learn how to properly interact with its users, how to properly utilize its employees, and how to listen and adapt.
      We Hex players may have a tendency to rib on Hearthstone, but Blizzard is an excellent example of a company that succeeds [or at least, succeeds even more] due to engaging and responding to its fanbase. HexEnt never needed to compete with Blizzard but, at the same time, those heights are where HexEnt should have been aiming for from the start. Ambition in game development shouldn't just be limited to how rich a creative output you can manage, but should also aim to deliver that creative output in the best way possible.

      There are those of us waiting for any kind of encouraging sign that the company has matured, and that we can invest in their content again. As is, however..
      Well, at least Hex will remain with us as a fond (albeit frustration-filled) memory.

      However flawed it may have been, I thank HexEnt for the experience they shared with us.

      I think I'm going to stop checking in on the game now.

      Best wishes to all of you fellow Hexers. [FROSTHEART]

      The post was edited 5 times, last by Azuchi ().

    • New

      Firellius wrote:

      AnomalyCobra wrote:

      i dunno if 20 active forum users would warrant more than a survive agenda.
      But that's 20 active forum users who've stuck it out for, what, 7 months now? Loads of former HEX players still -want- this game to be good, and I bet we're all secretly hoping for some announcement that the IP and game were sold to a different company.
      I wouldn't even mind losing my entire account if that happened. I've spent over 500 euros on this and I wouldn't mind if my account was lost in the rebuilding of HEX in the hands of a company that knows what to do and engages its community.

      This game was phenomenal in its concept and parts of its execution. Its card mechanisms were so unbelievably fun and outlandish and creative… The world so vibrant and energetic!

      It's just that PvE got no more development, Siege's design was awful even on paper, never mind the execution, and PvP went stale.

      And yet, despite how agonising this death is, we've still got people hanging around, begging for a little glimmer of hope that this thing turns around.

      I honestly believe this game can succeed if done right.
      Love this comment.