Current Active Standard Streamers?

  • I don't know if they're guildmates or belong to the same testing group but each decided it for their own personal reasons as far as I saw and heard from their announcements, so it wasn't a group thing.

    Don't know which is worse, them stopping streaming or stopping playing.
  • marty isnt part of prismatic and im sad tp hear he has moved on as well. I beleive he fought the good fight to the very end.

    I will confirm that i am on a temporary and or permanant break from hex. Although i am streaming/playing other tcg's, i am still advertizing hex on my stream as i do wish for the games revival.

    I will also confirm prismatic has began to open up to other tcg communities to preserve and expand the guild as well as an effort to bring more attention to hex. Magic is the first game we have began to support.
  • Not a fan of call outs either. Seems like stirring the pot for views. That said, there is a reason Unsleeved Media has and retains its audience so giving your audience what they want is part of the role.

    Listening to the video now and it feels/sounds petty. I have also never been a fan of drama. Maybe folks eat this type of material up but it is not my sammich
  • Oh man, we have a term in Argentina when in politics you get done that: "Carpetazo". Basically, the rumour (probably true) says that every important person in the country has his own folder ("carpeta" in spanish) -like this one- being made by the local intelligence services with their own little dirty secrets ready to be thrown (that's what the -azo suffix means) at any time. So, "carpetazo" means that a "folder has been thrown". Hence, every time a local scandal shakes the media or the social networks, we just say "someone got a carpetazo".

    Not that I care, actually. But I just wanted that everyone knows this because I find the term actually beautiful, and, to be fair, these forums are about to be a big off topic forums before they close, so, whatever.
    Twitter: @Plotynus
  • I've always loved the etymology of words and phrases like that. I'm endlessly fascinated by turns of phrase in other cultures, especially when there are ones that can't even be accurately translated into other languages or have highly specific local meanings that just sound like nonsense in other languages.

    Probably my current favorite is the old Polish phrase that literally translates to "Would you like to buy a brick?" Which actually means "I am robbing you - give me your money or I'll bash your head in with this brick." The only ones that are funnier and cooler than that to me are ones Patrick Rothfuss made up for his Cealdish merchants to say... things like "Shit in God's beard," and "Don't stick a fork in your eye over it" (which roughly is meant to mean "don't let it drive you crazy"). Fun stuff. :)
    --ossuary

    "Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none."
    - Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well
  • I also like glossology tidbits/lessons. In greek, the word for "slanderer" is συκοφάντης. There's even the word "Sycophant", which is lent directly. "Σύκο" translates to "fig" (the ficus' fruit) and "φάντης" is derived from the "φαίνομαι", meaning "to be shown".

    The history: starting ~500 B.C., the city-state of Athens prohibited exporting of foodstuffs and making a profit out of it, since they consumed close to 100% of what they produced. Figs were, I guess, the most common thing people tried to illegally export. Probably due to size, they were easy to smuggle or something. Hence, if someone was to accuse you of illegally exporting figs, he was a sycophant (he was "showing" the "figs" you were hiding and trying to smuggle). If people had a personal vendetta against you, or wanted to suck up to the authorities, they'd accuse others of illegally exporting figs. It was probably common enough and hard to prove, so it was pushing the boundaries of "innocent until proven guilty".

    With time a sycophant became a synonym (and, in greek, it's the main word used to denote a) slanderer.

    Hey, look, the word even fits with today's conversation going :)

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Vroengard ().

  • Vroengard wrote:

    I also like glossology tidbits/lessons. In greek, the word for "slanderer" is συκοφάντης. There's even the word "Sycophant", which is lent directly. "Σύκο" is the translation for "fig" (the ficus' fruit) and "φάντης" is derived from the "φαίνομαι", meaning "to be shown".

    The history: starting ~500 B.C., the city-state of Athens prohibited exporting of foodstuffs and making a profit out of it, since they consumed close to 100% of what they produced. Figs were, I guess, the most common thing people tried to illegally export. Probably due to size, they were easy to smuggle or something. Hence, if someone was to accuse you of illegally exporting figs, he was a sycophant (he was "showing" the "figs" you were hiding and trying to smuggle). If people had a personal vendetta against you, or wanted to suck up to the authorities, they'd accuse others of illegally exporting figs. It was probably common enough and hard to prove, so it was pushing the boundaries of "innocent until proven guilty".

    With time a sycophant became a synonym (and, in greek, it's the main word used to denote a) slanderer.

    Hey, look, the word even fits with today's conversation going :)
    Ancient greek is the best language I've ever learned. A lot of concepts behind every word. For example, all the words derived from φαίνω (phaino - to appear) and have direct impact in philosophy, religion, etc (for example: that root appears either in phenomenon -i.e. something that occurs- and phantom -i.e. something that "appears"). I left my studies in ancient philosophy and religion a few years ago and I kind of miss them from time to time. So, if you bring up a greek etymology, you can be sure I'll be quoting it and saying another nerdy stuff.
    Twitter: @Plotynus
  • Ossuary wrote:

    I've always loved the etymology of words and phrases like that. I'm endlessly fascinated by turns of phrase in other cultures, especially when there are ones that can't even be accurately translated into other languages or have highly specific local meanings that just sound like nonsense in other languages.

    Probably my current favorite is the old Polish phrase that literally translates to "Would you like to buy a brick?" Which actually means "I am robbing you - give me your money or I'll bash your head in with this brick." The only ones that are funnier and cooler than that to me are ones Patrick Rothfuss made up for his Cealdish merchants to say... things like "Shit in God's beard," and "Don't stick a fork in your eye over it" (which roughly is meant to mean "don't let it drive you crazy"). Fun stuff. :)
    Why, I must admit it took me a while ti get what you meant by that, and I figured out it was caused by a slight, albeit important detail in the translation, namely, you say "Can I/May I sell you a brick/knife/rock/kick"

    Also, hi guys, still browsing the forums from time to time in search of some glorious message that everything's fine... Funny, huh.