Pinned Frost Ring Arena - Deck Tier List

    • NicoSharp wrote:

      It is annoying to me that I can not build a very synergistic deck around a them
      Ya, I think this sums up one of my biggest annoyances as well. It feels like a lot of encounters were balanced around the assumption people are abusing some of these ridiculously strong cards... so all decks have to abuse them to have a chance, which means that archetypes or themes that DON'T involve those crazy strong cards... just aren't viable for the most part without muddying their thematics to such a degree that you might as well not even try the theme...


      @NicoSharp

      When rating affordability, are you counting equipment?

      Because if so, your 'cloud shift host' deck is no longer an s for affordability(due to inflation on certain out of print equipment items). Cloudfeather fan often runs 1200-2000 plat, and the chestpiece for the Swiftpaws was last sold at 4900 plat. Ruin of Ripple is ~300 each(1200 plat), 110 plat each for first of the host, 100 each for paradigm shift, etc...

      The deck is running close to being a B now, all told.
      Gamer. Streamer. Photographer. Writer. Anime Lover. Possessor of Stuffed Animals.

      Also... I'm terrible at this game.

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Eraia ().

    • I posted this in another thread a while ago, but I wanted to give a shout out to this deck:

      hex.tcgbrowser.com/#!/deck=240663

      This deck has come so tantalizingly close to perfect runs, and is generally a fun deck to play.

      Consistency - A Tier - Powered by a bunch of early aggressive Elf troops that overwhelm opponents early, this deck routinely just floods the board with more and more elves, which is accelerated by both the Ashwood Soloist and the Feralroot Archdruid resource acceleration (With Equipment)

      Affordability - A Tier - You could probably get this into S Tier if you cut the Wells of Savagery and replace them with Shards of Savagery instead, but I think having the resource available on the well on the same turn is important for the deck, otherwise you'll cut into some of the tempo and reduce the Consistency down to B tier.

      Specialization - A Tier - The deck has a favorable matchup against most encounters, though anything with cheap removal or board wipes to take out your resource acceleration or early troops can hurt. This includes: Blood Sphinx, Emberspire Witch, Lazgar's Bloodletter. Deck can also struggle against Lightning Skyhunter, though it does have outs.

      Hogarth Tuned - C Tier - The mid-ranged nature of the deck makes Elite Hogarth almost unwinnable without the perfect hand, Normal Hogarth isn't too bad, though.


      Tricks and Keys to Play:

      - With the curve of the deck being fairly low and filled with resource generation, you very rarely run into resource problems. Most two-shard hands are keepable thanks to the resource generation of Soloist and Feralroot Archdruid.

      - The deck has a multitude of ways to win which make it excellent for adapting to your current challenge. You can overwhelm them early with an aggressive pile of elf troops, you can burn them out with Valors and Heart of Embers, or you can pump up a giant Stingshot Sniper to ping away at their health and board position.

      - In situations where you are trying to out-race the AI, you have the advantage thanks to the health gain of Feralroot Archdruid's equipment and the Feralroot Acorn. Feralroot Archdruid's equipment gives you a nice way to keep yourself alive while simultaneously accelerating your resources thanks to his exhaust ability. It's important to note that the Archdruid gives you an immediate permanant resource which can help to power out even more elves onto the board.

      - With 32 elves in the deck, An Empowered Festival Barker is likely to just completely refill your hand with more elves. Additionally, the troop-heavy theme of the deck makes Nerissa hit more often then miss. With the equipment making her a swiftstriker, there are very few encounters that can avoid getting thumped a few times early by Nerissa, helping to power your early rush.

      - With Valors, Aggro, Card Draw, and Health Gain - there are few encounters where you don't have at least some outs if things go poorly. Even the tough matchups against the removal-heavy decks can be beaten or outlasted if you are able to make use of Festival Barker.

      Overall, this is a fun deck for folks who just like to "Get in there" and not have to worry about finding that combo piece or mulliganing until you have the perfect hand. If I were to experiment with improvements, I would try swapping out the Songstress and maybe a Stingshot Sniper for a few Voice of the Ashwoods. Unfortunately, I don't have any, so I was unable to try with those. :)
    • Just following up on Brynhildr's post with my own elf deck. My variant is a lot less budget, but here it is:

      hex.tcgbrowser.com/#!/deck=361e09f324d9874b8173b26279e35307

      For the side by side comparison, 19 cards different so these decks, while certainly having some overlap are definitely distinct (and use different champions):

      +4 Howling Brave
      +2 Primordial Sabretooth
      +3 Feralroot Songstress
      +4 Voice of the Ashwood
      +1 Feralroot Archdruid
      +4 Artisinal Sommelier
      +1 Emberleaf Evoker

      -4 Ashwood Firebrand
      -4 Satyr's Roost Bard
      -4 Burn
      -1 Heart of Embers
      -1 Nerissa (not playing the full 4 simply because it's unique)
      -3 Wild Shard
      -2 Ruby Shard

      Firstly I need to point out that, while it's not cheap, the equipment for Stingshot Sniper is absolutely insane and an incredible upgrade over the Burn equipment. If you can get your hand on Sling Stone Sleeve, you won't regret it since plenty of our powerful elves are Rangers: Stingshot Sniper itself, Festival Barker, Heart of Embers, and Ashwood Soloist.

      I'm playing 5 fewer shards which is a lot, which comes from having more ramp and the fact that I think 24 is just too many, though 19 may be too few and it probably should be 20 or 21.

      My variant focuses a bit more heavily on the ramp aspect, playing 4x Howling Brave, 4x Sonstress, 4x Feralroot Archdruid, 4x Voice of the Ashwood instead of playing the full valor package. Packing 8 ramping one-drops means you can more consistently play Feralroot Songstress on turn 2, which can have a massive impact on the opponent's ability to cast spells since they're going to only have 1 temporary resource on their second turn even with a shard drop. All this ramp is easily put to good use as Empowered Festival Barker is an insane card.

      The sommeliers are additional tools to help make sure your ramp doesn't go to waste by giving you some wine to draw more cards and spend your resources on. The bonus attack wine fills the same role as the valors in Brynhildr's version and are also just insane with Stingshot Sniper.

      Without the rest of the valor package, the Heart of Embers are obviously a lot worse, but still a very powerful card even if you only get 1 or 2 valors out of it.

      Finally, I'm playing a few Sabretooths instead of Burns since they're a troop to trigger off of Nerissa and my variant has a lot more ramp, so I actually just pay the 7 resources a decent amount of the time, though lacking speed and costing an extra resource to play definitely leaves some situations where you wish you had Burn instead.

      In conclusion, if you're enjoying Brynhildr's deck and looking to try out some non-budget changes that veer the deck away from the valor package and more heavily into ramp, check out my version. Notably, with the extra ramp and Sabretooths that ignore cost increases and can kill Frostmare, this version does better against Elite Hogarth, though it's still a challenge. It's also definitely possible that I should be playing Satyr's Roost Bard and some extra valor producers, but I've just never been a fan of any of the wild or ruby valor producers other than Heart of Embers as I simply don't think they're good enough to be worthwhile.

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Steric ().

    • I haven't seen many sockets decks, maybe because I haven't been looking around hard enough, but the two of my decks with the highest consistency are sockets decks so I thought I'd share them.

      Just to note, I'm currently missing the Sentry of Nulzann equipment, Nulzann's Malicious Injector, which would make both of these decks a fair bit stronger, but even without the equipment, these decks are incredibly consistent and powerful.

      Ardent Sockets: hex.tcgbrowser.com/#!/deck=1600e41c89afb4250d4542dc1234b974
      Consistency = A tier, this may deserve an S, but I'll be conservative. It easily wins 90% of the games, but it more than 10% of the games it takes longer than 6 turns to win.
      Affordability = A tier, TCGbrowser puts it at $100, but counts the Anglers as 101p, so it's basically $99. The majority of the cost is actually coming from the shardbase, though the deck would lose a lot of consistency or speed subbing those out for slowshards or basics. Additionally, the singleton Runebind is the most expensive card in the deck and is just a fun-of and can easily be replaced.
      Specialization = S tier, this deck pretty much can handle anything thrown at it. It can get on the board fast to fight the aggressive opponents and out-grind the grindy opponents with Altar of Nulzann.
      Hogarth = B tier probably. Hogarth is tough, but definitely manageable and rarely manages to take all 3 lives.

      Explanation:
      Ardent Recruiter + Sentry of Nulzann lets you dump your hand quickly while Emsee and Altar let you grind card advantage to beat boardwipes and removal while Animus of Nulzann ensures that you'll always come out on top in a battle of size. A pair of Alachian Anglers lets you set up an infinite combo if you've got at least 3 Ardent Recruiters and finally, Protectorate Defender with the double damage gem is just an insane amount of value and are our primary target for Alachian Anglers. Finally, Bishop Elijah lets us trade away our Crusaders or other large troops and get them back or simply lets you retrieve a massive Ardent Recruiter that got hit by removal.

      Some specific tips: Don't be in a rush to get Altar of Nulzann onto the table to maximize cards drawn, the deck has plenty of card advantage, so prioritize the cost reducers and hold the Altar of Nulzann until you have the resources to play it and immediately draw a card off of it. It's far more likely that you'll lose to not dumping your hand quickly enough than you'll lose due to running out of gas.

      Against Elite Emberspire Witch, you need to make sure your Ardent Recruiters aren't getting picked off. Even if it means playing nothing on turn 2, hold your Recruiters until you can immediately follow them up with additional ardent troops to grow them out of Fireball and Crackling Bolt range. If the recruiter doesn't get hit by removal, it'll easily slay the witch before you get burned out.

      And my second sockets deck that I wanted to share

      Underworld Sockets: hex.tcgbrowser.com/#!/deck=212130
      Consistency = A tier, this version is a little weaker than the Ardent version from what I've found, but still easily A tier and possibly deserving of S-tier.
      Affordability = A tier
      Specialization = S tier
      Hogarth = B tier

      A lot of parallels to the ardent variant. The real all-stars of this version are Forgotten Monarch and Gemborn Matron. The monarch is equipped with Gladiator and Galvanize to generate an obscene amount of charges, especially when you have multiple Spiritbound Vicar already in play. Gemborn Matron, on the other hand, is removal and really pads our life total and can be aggressively traded away and bought back with Elijah's charge power if you have a combination of at least 2 Sentry of Nulzann and Underworld Recruiters.

      If anyone has played similar decks, I'd love to hear their thoughts and suggestions.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Steric ().

    • New

      I'm a very new player to the game and decided to use Koto's budget mill deck in FRA. Really happy with the results and I just farmed gold/the cards I needed, so I didn't have to spend any real-world money.

      Best FRA run so far is 2 losses and I have faced Elite Hogarth I beat him both times. Really pleased with the performance. I even managed to get a win against the Archon of Nulzann, though he's all but a guaranteed loss with this deck. The Burly Botanist hasn't been a challenge at all, faced him 5-6 times.

      BTW, Fever Blooms are really cheap now. I picked up 4 for less than 12K gold in the AH (maybe a fluke, those were the only ones listed for gold at the time), and subbed them in for the Dream Eagles. I'd played maybe 8-10 full trips through FRA with the Dream Eagles and rarely played them due to their high cost. Typically I'm winning games turn 4-5, which means it's mechanically impossible to field the Eagles anyway.

      Thanks for the guide Nico, it's really helped make this game accessible to a newcomer!
    • New

      kjolnir wrote:

      I'm a very new player to the game and decided to use Koto's budget mill deck in FRA. Really happy with the results and I just farmed gold/the cards I needed, so I didn't have to spend any real-world money.

      Best FRA run so far is 2 losses and I have faced Elite Hogarth I beat him both times. Really pleased with the performance. I even managed to get a win against the Archon of Nulzann, though he's all but a guaranteed loss with this deck. The Burly Botanist hasn't been a challenge at all, faced him 5-6 times.

      BTW, Fever Blooms are really cheap now. I picked up 4 for less than 12K gold in the AH (maybe a fluke, those were the only ones listed for gold at the time), and subbed them in for the Dream Eagles. I'd played maybe 8-10 full trips through FRA with the Dream Eagles and rarely played them due to their high cost. Typically I'm winning games turn 4-5, which means it's mechanically impossible to field the Eagles anyway.

      Thanks for the guide Nico, it's really helped make this game accessible to a newcomer!
      You should never cast the eagles they are there for the ability they get from equipment.
    • New

      Wolzarg wrote:

      kjolnir wrote:

      I'm a very new player to the game and decided to use Koto's budget mill deck in FRA. Really happy with the results and I just farmed gold/the cards I needed, so I didn't have to spend any real-world money.

      Best FRA run so far is 2 losses and I have faced Elite Hogarth I beat him both times. Really pleased with the performance. I even managed to get a win against the Archon of Nulzann, though he's all but a guaranteed loss with this deck. The Burly Botanist hasn't been a challenge at all, faced him 5-6 times.

      BTW, Fever Blooms are really cheap now. I picked up 4 for less than 12K gold in the AH (maybe a fluke, those were the only ones listed for gold at the time), and subbed them in for the Dream Eagles. I'd played maybe 8-10 full trips through FRA with the Dream Eagles and rarely played them due to their high cost. Typically I'm winning games turn 4-5, which means it's mechanically impossible to field the Eagles anyway.

      Thanks for the guide Nico, it's really helped make this game accessible to a newcomer!
      You should never cast the eagles they are there for the ability they get from equipment.
      That certainly makes a lot more sense, I guess I read that equipment modification to mean the card needed to be played first. Also, not sure I even have the equipment, so I'll check when I get home.
    • New

      kjolnir wrote:

      And just got my first perfect FRA run, didn't lose a match! Also, didn't face Archon, so sometimes you just get lucky, I guess.
      Happy to see you did good hope my information about equipment helped and never be afraid to ask questions if things look strange in a deck. Most likely there is a reason but sometimes it can be hard to discern that reason on your own.